Recent Articles

After the 2011 Tunisian revolution, the country’s population was bombarded with news about corruption in the natural resource sector. (Tunisia produces oil, gas and mainly phosphates as minerals.) However, coverage remained shallow and sometimes politicized.

With over a decade of journalism experience, Xinhua News Agency senior correspondent Justice Adoboe is far more experienced than the typical NRGI media trainee. In covering the complex extractives space, however, Adoboe said he has room to grow. NRGI trainers, meanwhile, discovered the course itself had to grow and change.

NRGI is rolling out this year’s training program for African journalists interested in improving their knowledge of and skills in covering the extractive sectors of oil, gas and minerals.

Across sub-Saharan Africa, civil society groups and journalists have been playing an increasingly important role in advocating for governance reform. Part of their aim is to increase the chances that their countries’ sub-soil wealth might be transformed into meaningful strides in development.

Tunisia has been celebrated by the international community as a beacon of hope and as fertile ground for transitional democracy in a region rocked by political conflict and unrest.

In December, the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI), in partnership with a team of trainers at the Yangon School of Journalism (YJS) launched the first dedicated, comprehensive course for journalists...

Students from the Madeleine Albright Institute of Global Affairs at Wellesley College recently asked NRGI governance policy analyst Marie Lintzer some fundamental and important questions about the governance of the extractive sector. We share the informative Q&A here on NRGI’s blog.

Greetings from the first of two weeks of the summer school course that the NRGI organizes annually in Yaoundé, Cameroon, in partnership with the Catholic University of Central Africa...

Imagine this: A biochemical process forms hydrocarbons, in reserves that are proven or unproven, and in types that are sweet and light or heavy and sour. Then find out the commercial viability of such reserves and measure the output in barrels per day...

Cameroon is one of fourteen African countries that have joined EITI, a global coalition of partners committed to improving open and accountable management of natural resource revenues...

In April the Revenue Watch Institute [now the Natural Resource Governance Institute] organized a three-day workshop with Khazar University, in Baku, where stakeholders gathered from Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan and Ukraine to strengthen their networks and knowledge of extractive issues.

African journalists soaked up training at this workshop, meant to bolster their ability to cover the extractive sector.

Participants in the fourth class of RWI's ongoing training program for strengthening media oversight of the extractive sectors of oil, gas, and mining.

Organized by the Francophone Africa Hub, 34 participants attended the course including representatives of media and civil society organizations from many resource rich countries.

RWI is offering journalists in Ghana, Tanzania and Uganda a chance to learn more about the extractive industries in a six-month program on covering oil, gas and mineral sectors.

Tanzania is the latest country to benefit from RWI's media training program.

On 5 December, 16 Guinean journalists took a field trip to the country’s largest bauxite mine.

Five of the winners of ACME/RWI's prizes for best reporting on oil, gas and mining are alumni of our media training program.

Fifteen Guinean journalists embarked upon a 10-day training program on understanding and reporting on the oil and mining industries.

Revenue Watch and the Open Society Institute of West Africa announce a training program for Guinean journalists who wish to build their knowledge and skills on the extractives sector.

Crude oil sales make up 70 percent of the government’s annual revenue, so it's imperative for journalists to know how oil revenue is managed.

Revenue Watch's media training program enables journalists to hold government and companies more accountable.

Ghanaian and Ugandan journalists explored issues from petroleum science to oil legislation and traveled onsite to Uganda's oil development region.