Recent Articles

In November 2015, PWYP members from across Eurasia met in Ulaanbaatar for an NRGI-led training session to discuss common extractives governance challenges their countries face. Shrinking civil society space was a dominant concern.

Today, Switzerland-based trading house Trafigura disclosed how much it paid to several governments in exchange for commodities in its first annual responsibility report. For decades, physical commodity traders have embraced secrecy as a basic part of their business model, even when dealing with public institutions. The disclosures by Trafigura represent a much-needed step away from this unfortunate tradition. There remains, however, ample room for improvement.

Switzerland, the world’s leading commodity trading hub, must pave the way for more transparency in natural resource payments. The Swiss government should alter its course and include commodity trading in a pending transparency law.

In a detailed submission to the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), economist Robert Conrad of Duke University recently shared his expert perspective on the critical importance of oil, gas and mining companies publicly reporting project-level payments to governments around the world.

NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann recently spoke with SUSTAIN, the International Financial Corporation’s new online platform for business.

Increasing the transparency in the extractive industries has been a battle that has been fought over the last decade. The Publish What You Pay coalition launched in 2002, and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) was created a year later. The result? Public awareness of the size and potential of revenues from oil, gas and mining grew, and a movement towards open data in the sector has gathered steam.

Experts at the Natural Resource Governance Institute welcomed Canada’s new law requiring oil, gas and mining companies to disclose their payments to governments...

Recently CSOs from eight Eurasian countries gathered in Istanbul for a regional meeting of extractive sector governance stakeholders, preceded by a two-day training organized by the NRGI and the Publish What You Pay secretariat...

The Canadian federal government has tabled a new law that would require oil, gas and mining companies to publicly disclose payments they make to governments around the world.

Four years ago, Mongolia’s vast mineral wealth prompted some to call it the “Saudi Arabia of Central Asia”. Today, the country is struggling with declining mineral revenues and inflation.

On September 18, the World Bank and NRGI will host a half-day discussion in London on the challenges and opportunities in supporting natural resource-rich countries to manage their hydrocarbon and mineral wealth, part of the “New Directions in Governance” conference...

Recently NRGI and the Catholic University of Central Africa held a two-day conference in Yaoundé, Cameroon, on governance and oversight of the extractive industries.

On July 16, 2014, the Tax Appeal Tribunal of Uganda ruled in favor of the Uganda Revenue Authority (URA) in its suit against Tullow Oil...

Publish What You Pay Canada and the NRGI welcome the statement of support today by Canada's energy and mines ministers for the Government of Canada's decision to enact federal legislation to enhance the transparency of payments in the mining, oil and gas sectors.

In April 2014, residents of Tsogttsetsii and Khanbogd soums (districts) gathered for a meeting on mining. These soums, located in a remote part of the Gobi desert, had been the setting for mining meetings before—but this one was different.

Ghana is seeking to increase the information available to citizens on mining, oil and gas extraction activities. The West African nation, which has the continent's second largest gold output as well as valuable undersea oil and gas deposits...

Publish What You Pay coalition partners in Southeast Asia launched the Civil Society Organization Technical Working Group, a team organized at the most recent PWYP conference in Manila to carry out a plan to integrate free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) into national policies in the region.

More than a hundred civil society actors from various countries gathered to talk about two hot topics in the Asia-Pacific region: extractive issues and the future of natural resource governance.

Since the massive Oyu Tolgoi gold and copper mine opened in the Gobi Desert in 2010, billions of Mongolian tugrugs have poured into the government’s coffers in Ulaanbaatar...

Tullow, the Anglo-Irish oil company that works mostly in Africa, voluntarily disclosed detailed information about the $1.5 billion it paid to governments in 2012 and 2013. Appearing in its 2013 Annual Report, the data is broken down by payment type (taxes, royalties, etc.) for each of Tullow’s projects, located in 22 countries

Canada is global mining, pure and simple. Over 50 percent of the world’s mining companies are based in Canada and Canadian mining companies explore, develop and produce in over 100 countries...

Canadian exploration and mining associations, in collaboration with civil society organizations, have released recommendations for the development of a payment transparency standard for all publicly-traded mining companies in Canada.

Kofi Annan spoke in Geneva last night to celebrate the Graduate Institute moving into the Maison de la paix, Kofi Annan delivered the opening lecture of the Institute's 2013-2014 academic year.

Senators and international investors have written the SEC to urge quick re-issue of a strong rule implementing Section 1504 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010.