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Indonesia’s petroleum and mining sectors helped power the country’s transition to middle-income status. As considerable drivers of Indonesia’s annual economic growth, extractive industries contribute about a third of exports and state revenues, generate hundreds of thousands of jobs, and fuel the growth of non-resource-based industries.

China has been included in the Top 10 list of foreign investors in Indonesia since 2014. As in many other countries, China’s interest in Indonesia is in its energy and mining sectors; more than half of its total investment has been directed toward extractive industries.

This photo essay is the sixth installment in NRGI's 2015 extractive industries photo documentary project, which aims to capture the complex political, environmental and social realities at resource extraction sites throughout Myanmar.


The large fall in the price of oil since mid-2014 is on the whole good news for Tanzania, which is a net importer of oil. Indeed, Tanzanian stocks are around 40 percent higher than when oil prices began falling from a peak of $115 a barrel on June 19 last year...

This photo essay is the fifth installment in NRGI's 2015 extractive industries photo documentary project, which aims to capture the complex political, environmental and social realities at resource extraction sites throughout Myanmar.


Indonesia's President recently outlined new economic policies which aim to produce greater certainty and efficiency in business through deregulation, de-bureaucratization, and improved law enforcement. His overall objective is to revive foreign investment in Indonesia in the context of global economic slowdown.

In the second of a series of photo essays by six different photographers in Myanmar, Minzayar documents the way in which jade from Myanmar makes its way, untaxed, to bustling Chinese markets.


In the first of a series of photo essays by six different photographers in Myanmar, Lauren DeCicca has documented the challenging circumstances faced by community members living alongside the giant copper mine.


In 2014, NRGI commissioned images by a Myanmar photographer, Minzayar, of the illegal jade miners that have flowed into the country’s northern Kachin state in pursuit of higher incomes. The project allowed thousands of viewers worldwide to connect faces to one of the most famously controversial aspects of the country’s extractive economy. Because of the attention and interest generated by Minzayar’s photos, NRGI has committed to further visually mapping extractives realities in Myanmar.

For the first time since it won in 1990, the National League for Democracy (NLD), led by Aung San Suu Kyi, will be contesting a general election. (The NLD won 43 out of 45 seats in a 2012 by-election.) Should the party or a coalition of opposition parties win, Myanmar will have its first majority civilian government in Myanmar in 53 years.

Since its launch in 2002, the EITI has improved revenue transparency in many regions. So far, nearly 40 countries have released some 140 EITI reports detailing the receipt of extractive revenues by governments from oil, gas and mining companies. In 2013, implementing countries adopted a new reporting standard, releasing even more detailed information.

Gold is the number-one mineral produced in the archipelago in value terms, and studies indicate that small-scale mining activities contribute 80 percent of gold production in the country.

A noteworthy study from NRGI partner Réseau de Lutte contre la Faim (RELUFA) combines EITI data and legal analysis to show the impact of mining projects on communities in northern Cameroon—where, despite 50 years of industrial extraction, social and economic development is lagging.

With the new administration in Indonesia comes an opportunity to make much-needed changes in the way mining licenses are granted.

In resource-rich countries around the world, senior-level policymakers face difficult extractive sector decisions—from how to attract investors and manage revenues to how to engage citizens and protect the environment.

The bumpy road leading to the gold town of Obuasi in the Ashanti region depicts the worrying state of an area that has played a significant role in Ghana’s economic development...

In April 2014, residents of Tsogttsetsii and Khanbogd soums (districts) gathered for a meeting on mining. These soums, located in a remote part of the Gobi desert, had been the setting for mining meetings before—but this one was different.

Beyond the IRM and a government self-assessment, an essential component of OGP work in any country is the development of so-called shadow reports, which help identify gaps in the implementation process and measure progress...

What are "shadow reports" and how are they used to help OGP in making governments "more open, accountable, and responsive to citizens"? Paul Maassen, OGP civil society coordinator, says they provide "an extra tool to push for real government commitment."

During last month’s Asia-Pacific hub training in Indonesia, RWI-NRC and the Universitas Gadjah Mada organized a field trip for participants to Bojonegoro, an oil-producing district in East Java...

It takes a lot of water to mine copper. This week a new report from Chile revealed that copper mining in the country’s northern region consumes the equivalent of 20 Olympic swimming pools per hour...

A few weeks ago colleagues from the Myanmar Coalition for Transparency and Accountability and I represented Myanmar at RWI-NRC’s three-day training workshop on subnational governance of the extractive sector, in Bogor, Indonesia...

For three days in March, I took part in a training conducted by the Revenue Watch Institute – Natural Resource Charter (RWI-NRC) on subnational governance of the extractive sector. To attend, I travelled from Malaysia to Bogor, Indonesia...

Most southeast Asian countries operate relatively well developed extractive sectors. However, at the local level, significant knowledge asymmetries remain...

Since the massive Oyu Tolgoi gold and copper mine opened in the Gobi Desert in 2010, billions of Mongolian tugrugs have poured into the government’s coffers in Ulaanbaatar...