Democratic Republic of Congo

While natural resources have the potential to bring development to the poorest countries in the world, realizing that potential is often a challenge. Opaque allocation of rights to extract oil, gas or minerals; secrecy around who really owns the companies doing the extraction; and non-disclosure of contracts often conspire to prevent average citizens from benefiting from their country’s resources.

In the last decade, governments of resource-rich countries like Zambia, Guinea and Mongolia have struggled to tax their extractive industries more effectively. It is a tall order—countries must design an inescapable tax regime that taxes companies more in times of high profits and allows some relief in periods when gains are low.

This country strategy note summarizes an NRGI analysis of country context and reform priorities. It also outlines NRGI’s engagement in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), complementing the work of other actors. Developments will naturally affect the assessments and objectives described herein. Updates to this synopsis may be made as events require.

Citizens from resource-rich African countries are showing ever-greater interest in the management of extractive resources. Civil society members and journalists are demanding transparency and accountability.

Extractive industry governance and the role of state-owned enterprises across sub-Saharan Africa are squarely in the spotlight after three huge scandals.

Managing public expectations is one of the toughest challenges that governments face now that commodity prices have dramatically declined. A gathering earlier this month in Tanzania brought together public officials from 15 emerging producers to discuss the implications of the price drop on their strategies.

While the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative has successfully increased transparency in the extractive sector over the last ten years, data from its reports are often underutilized by global and in-country actors. If this challenge is overcome, EITI reports could inform much more to policymaking and public debate, and thereby contribute to better governance and accountability in the oil, gas and mining sector.

In a wide-ranging interview this month with Critical Resource, NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann discusses differences in corporate behavior between the mining and hydrocarbon sectors...

Some state-owned enterprises have been effective vehicles for state policy. Others have fostered inefficiency, revenue shortfalls and corruption...

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is in the midst of finalizing the fourth pillar of its new Fiscal Transparency Code (FTC) and public consultation on the draft has just drawn to a close...

Students from the Madeleine Albright Institute of Global Affairs at Wellesley College recently asked NRGI governance policy analyst Marie Lintzer some fundamental and important questions about the governance of the extractive sector. We share the informative Q&A here on NRGI’s blog.

Switzerland-based commodity trading firms are behind a much larger proportion of African governments’ oil sales than previously thought, new research from the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI), the Berne Declaration and SWISSAID has shown.

The sale of crude oil by governments and their national oil companies is one of the least scrutinized aspects of oil sector governance. This report is the first detailed examination of those sales, and focuses on the top ten oil exporting countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

Jean Pierre Okenda, coordonnateur adjoint de la Plateforme des Organisations de la Société Civile dans le Secteur Minier en République Démocratique du Congo, a participé à un atelier ITIE en février 2014. Nous avons saisi cette occasion pour lui poser quelques questions relatives aux défis et opportunités de gouvernance rencontrés dans son pays riche en ressources naturelles.

There are few countries where EITI is as well-known and discussed by stakeholders as in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A platform for discussions between government ministries, civil society, industry and parliament, many such actors also see it as a major opportunity for governance reform in the DRC’s mining and oil sectors.